"“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly. So that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.” -Theodore Roosevelt "


 

 

  • How to calm your anxiety, from a neuroscientist | Wendy Suzuki    (2023-03-22)
    What if you could transform your anxiety into something you can actually use during your work day? Neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki shares two evidence-based activities -- breathing and movement -- that can soothe your nervous system and fuel creativity and connection.
  • What happens to gas stations when the world goes electric? | Emily Grubert    (2023-03-21)
    When the world goes fully electric, what happens to the cars, tools and livelihoods that rely on fossil fuels? Civil engineer and environmental sociologist Emily Grubert visualizes what a clean energy future will look like, outlining the considerations everyone needs to undertake now as the critical, decades-long transition begins.
  • 3 skills every middle school boy needs | Jerome Hunter    (2023-03-17)
    Middle school is a time like no other, as significant biological and emotional changes coincide with profound personal growth, says educator Jerome Hunter. The middle school for boys that he founded centers on a program that helps redefine masculinity through what he calls the three "Cs" -- confidence, communication and community. He shares the growth he's seen when boys are encouraged to explore their own empathy -- and how it could lead to a more just world.
  • The surprising psychology behind your urge to break the rules | Paul Bloom    (2023-03-16)
    We all experience it: that desire to do something wrong just for the sake of it. Whether it's walking on manicured grass or sticking your finger in a friend's ice cream, psychologist Paul Bloom invites us to see the clever, creative and beautiful side of these minor impulses to do bad. He dives into the psychology behind this all-too-human condition -- and proposes that it helps make our world a little more unpredictable and fun.
  • Your 3-step guide to setting better boundaries at work | Nedra Glover Tawwab    (2023-03-15)
    Know you should establish clear limits at work but not sure how to do it? Here are a few strategies from relationship therapist and author Nedra Glover Tawwab that can help you feel more empowered and less overwhelmed, both on and off the job.
  • Who owns the internet of the future? | Ordinary Things    (2023-03-14)
    The emergence of data-driven mass surveillance "is threatening to turn privacy into a relic of the 20th century," says the anonymous YouTube creator known as Ordinary Things. Meanwhile, state-funded troll farms are spreading disinformation and curating chaos on platforms meant to connect us and revolutionize the way we live. Ordinary Things gives an enlightening account of the internet's strengths and weaknesses, warning that the fight for a free internet is a fight for our collective future.
  • 3 elements of true fun -- and how to have more of it | Catherine Price    (2023-03-13)
    What comes to mind when you think about the most fun moments of your life? Science journalist Catherine Price asked thousands of people across the world this question, and their answers led her to a new definition of "true" fun: a special confluence of playfulness, connection and flow. Hear her thoughts on why having fun is good for your mental and physical health and how to identify the tell-tale signs of "fake" fun -- as well as actionable tips for identifying what brings you joy. (This conversation, hosted by TED science curator David Biello, was part of an exclusive TED Membership event. Visit ted.com/membership to become a TED Member.)
  • Gourmet food for the final frontier | Phnam Bagley    (2023-03-10)
    What does an in-flight meal look like when you're traveling to Mars? Designer Phnam Bagley envisions a future where astronauts have nourishing, flavorful food reminiscent of home -- a giant leap from their current staple of "goop-in-a-bag." Learn more about her team's gourmet creations for galactic travel and how these innovations can improve life here on Earth.
  • How video games can level up the way you learn | Kris Alexander    (2023-03-09)
    Video games naturally tap into the way we learn: they focus our attention and track our progress as we head toward a clear goal. Kris Alexander, a professor of video game design and passionate gamer himself, thinks the same elements should be used in traditional education to cater to different learning styles and engage students across the world, both in-person and online.
  • How to be a team player -- without burning out | Rob Cross    (2023-03-08)
    Collaboration in the workplace is more important than ever -- but it's making us less productive in some ways. Here's what collaboration pioneer Rob Cross says is driving us to take on way too much -- and how we can reclaim our time and our peace of mind.
  • The clean energy hub of the future | Rebekah Shirley    (2023-03-07)
    Why aren't more people investing in Africa's green energy? Environmental researcher Rebekah Shirley outlines the continent's immense potential for renewable power and calls for collaborative international investment -- and partnership -- in Africa's climate future. "Let's cut past the talk and focus on unleashing the avalanche of a clean energy future that Africa is ready to deliver," says Shirley.
  • The fantastically weird world of photosynthetic sea slugs | Michael Middlebrooks    (2023-03-06)
    Meet the fantastically colorful and astonishingly adaptable sea slugs that found a way to photosynthesize (or create energy from sunlight) like plants. Diving deep into these often overlooked creatures, invertebrate zoologist Michael Middlebrooks introduces the solar-powered slugs that lost their shells -- but gained the ability to directly harness the power of the sun.
  • How one small idea led to $1 million of paid water bills | Tiffani Ashley Bell    (2023-03-03)
    When programmer Tiffani Ashley Bell learned that thousands of people in Detroit were facing water shutoffs because they couldn't afford to pay their bills, she decided to take action -- in the simplest, most obvious way possible. It's an inspiring story of how one person with tenacity and an idea can create monumental change -- and a demonstration that each of us can find our own way to help the world, even if it means starting without all the answers.
  • How to quit your job -- without ruining your career | Gala Jackson    (2023-03-01)
    Stuck in an unfulfilling or stagnant job? To achieve a smooth departure without burning bridges, try this three-step exit strategy from career coach Gala Jackson. She'll help you move on to your next position with courage, confidence and clarity.
  • The fascinating physics of insect pee | Saad Bhamla    (2023-02-28)
    Scientist Saad Bhamla is on a mission to answer a question most people don't think to ask: How do insects pee? Taking inspiration from the incredible "butt flickers" of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Bhamla presents a fascinating study of the physics behind how bugs take care of business and invites us to be more curious about the seemingly mundane.







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